Mātauranga Māori

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Mātauranga is a unique body of knowledge produced through and by Te Ao Māori (the Maōri world). It incorporates Māori traditional and contemporary knowledges, language, practices and culture. It encompasses concepts of knowledge and knowing that Māori ancestors brought with them to Aotearoa/New Zealand, and more contemporary areas of study such as kaitiakitanga, the Māori performing arts, Māori identity and Māori language revitalisation. According to Hikuroa (2017, p.5-6), mātauranga Māori is “a method for generating knowledge, and all of the knowledge generated according to that method” and “includes knowledge  generated using techniques consistent with the scientific method, but explained according to a Māori world view”.

Mātauranga Māori is a taonga, and as such requires protection. While iwi Māori are the primary kaitiaki of their knowledge, the university has an obligation to protect mātauranga Māori, and to provide a safe environment in which mātauranga can flourish. WAI 262 Waitangi Tribunal Report provides detail on the Crown’s kaitiakitanga obligations with regard to mātauranga.

Mātauranga Māori is held, developed, and taught by iwi Māori experts (or those considered experts by Māori). It is undergoing revival in te ao Māori, on marae and at wānanga. It is not homogenous and can be iwi, hapū and whānau specific. It finds expression in all fields of human endeavour including engineering, economics, music, sports, art, biology, education, law, medicine, physics, psychology, religion, architecture, philosophy, mathematics, technology, as well as daily life in whānau and in communities.

Mātauranga Māori includes te reo Māori. It can be expressed in te reo Māori or other languages. It can use methods similar to those of science, though it recognises dimensions of existence beyond those accessible to science, and makes sense of a fundamentally relational universe (see Salmond, 2012).

Charles Royal (2012) states that mātauranga Māori:

  • “assists the person in their understanding of their (usually) iwi and ancestral origins”
  • enables “an examination of existing fragments of traditional knowledges on a variety of topics” including the heavens, forests, medicines, biodiversity of oceans, and so on
  • explains the world. It is possible to ask “What is the mātauranga Māori view of birds, or trees or anger or love?”
  • provides guidance on how one ought to lead one’s life including tikanga [customs]
  • enables philosophical inquiry into, for instance, methodology and knowledge creation
  • relates to notions of indigeneity – how we can improve the way in which humankind exists and lives in the world, rekindling kinship (the network of relations) between people, and between people and the natural world.

 

  • Hikuroa, D. (2017). Mātauranga Māori—the ūkaipō of knowledge in New Zealand. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 47(1), 5-10.
  • Royal, C. (2012). Politics and knowledge: Kaupapa Maori and matauranga Maori. New Zealand Journal of Educational Studies, 47(2), 30-37.
  • Salmond, A. (2012). Back to the future: first encounters in Te Tai Rawhiti. Journal of the Royal Society of New Zealand, 42(2), 69-77.
Mihi Maker

Mihi Maker

This website allows you to code your own mini-game, using basic collision detection algorithms, and learn how to introduce yourself in te reo Māori.

Katuku Island

Katuku Island

The world has ended. You must now escape post-apocalyptic America. Make your way to the only uncontaminated Island in the world, Katuku. Build your own tribe and escape the crumbling city. Design Māori weapons, armoury and your own tribal Tattoo. Survive the turbulent ocean, the attack of other tribes, battle sea monsters and watch from above as swarms of angry Weta bombard your waka. Game to survive. Do literacy along the way and win bonus rewards! Enjoy extra time out gaming zones, build online Indigenous collaborations with other learners, and create your own Toa Pukenga - Online Traders store.

T.I.A

T.I.A

"T.I.A" (Te Ira Aotearoa, meaning the DNA of New Zealand) is an app that shares the creation story of Ranginui and Papatuānuku through augmented reality.

Māori Philosophy

Māori Philosophy

This website offers a brief introduction to Māori philosophy, and to a group of scholars engaged in such discussions and practices. The website includes a list of readings on Māori philosophy.

Kupu o te rā

Kupu o te rā

Learn Māori words, verbs, sentence construction, and more. Subscribe to the emailing list to receive kupu o te rā (word of the day).

A critical guide to Māori and Pākehā histories of Aotearoa

A critical guide to Māori and Pākehā histories of Aotearoa

This CPR (Curriculum Programme Resource) overview covers six topics that schools can use in a range of models of delivery. The six topics each have one Unit booklet which is divided into historical sections, with matching social science achievement objectives, a rationale, learning outcomes, core information, essential ideas, junior and senior activity possibilities, images, optional cross-curriculum term overviews, websites and references. This CPR is designed to support the New Zealand Curriculum (NZC) goals that require all New Zealanders to be knowledgeable about Maori and Pakeha, to understand the history of their relationship and enact the Treaty of Waitangi Principle (MOE, 2007). The resource meets the NZC Social Science Achievement Objectives (MOE, 2007). The CPR can be utilised successfully by all mainstream and Maori medium pathways. After reading the booklets for Professional Development, educators can select from the resource and create their own unit plans, lesson plans, and assessments for deliver as is an educators craft. This CPR has been designed and written by a Pakeha senior primary school teacher - Tamsin Hanley - who has twenty five years experience in Mainstream and Maori mediums teaching this content and a similarly experienced pathway teacher editor. Illustrated and edited by Ruth Lemon. This CPR will assist beginning to experienced educators of all ethnicities to teach these histories more effectively to our students of all ethnicities.

Critical Conversations in Kaupapa Māori

Critical Conversations in Kaupapa Māori

Kaupapa Māori theory and methodology developed over twenty years ago and have since become influential in social research, practice and policy areas. This collection furthers knowledge about kaupapa Māori by examining its effects over the decades, identifying and discussing its conventions and boundaries and reflecting on kaupapa Māori in social and educational research and practice.